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Choosing Names for Hunting Dogs

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When choosing names for hunting dogs, remember that a registered name or nickname will stay with that dog for its life and become part of its personality. Most people, when registering with the dog's registered company, will use part of the parent's names with his registered name or incorporate the grandparent's names that are on the pedigree. A female puppy may use the mother and grandmother's side, while the male pup will use the father and grandfather's name. The registered name is what will be entered into shows and use on papers for litters and stud records. This part of choosing names for hunting dogs is rather easy.

But when choosing a nickname that will be used for the dog, it is slightly different if you do decide to not use part of the registered name for it. Some people either do not register or do not use the registered name as part of the nickname. And then there are a few more rules to be considered. First of all, choose what appeals to you and what you like. Make a short list of you and your family's preferences. Let it roll of the tongue with the sound, trying to keep it simple with only a couple of syllables. Remember when it is out in the field, you are going to want to get its attention—quickly. Choosing names for hunting dogs this way, it is slightly more personal and refers to the individual dog alone—rather than the whole lineage.

Different breeds with different skills require different names, such as the Brittany uses names that refer to their hunting terrain, such as Bramble, or the name of Drake after the male mallard duck the dog may hunt well for. Choosing names for hunting dogs is a wide-open field focusing on the breed, what they hunt, where they hunt, and what their personality—all rolled into what you choose as your favorite sound and simple enough that it can be remembered and spelled easily.

Choosing good hunting dog names can be based on how the puppy acts and behaves. If it runs for the door, ready to hunt every time it sees the rife then the name "Winchester" or "Winchy' " may fit. "Ruger" or "Rugar," after old German guns, are another variation. Remington is the name of a firearms manufacturer, so this would be perfect for a dog that runs to hunt with excitement and vigor.

If you have purchased an older dog with either a registered name or nickname already present, then by all means use it. The dog already recognizes it and comes to it, and changing it may confuse the dog. If it is something so horrendous you cannot stand it, then try a variation of the name but with the same phonics. For instance, some people get carried away when choosing names for hunting dogs, and may tag the name "Mabon son of Modron" which refers to a "young man, son of mother"—so the dog knows to come to the first word which is Mabon, the M sound, instead of Lady or Jill.


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